Featured

Traumatic Experiences Can Be Inherited From Parent to Child

Can a traumatic experience, or any change in our lifestyle be transmitted genetically to our children? This phenomenon, called Epigenetic inheritance has been linked in a multitude of diseases, from obesity to psychiatric problems like bipolar disorder where there is a gene that is clearly identified. But up to this date, no mechanism by which this occurs has been identified. A team of scientists from the Institute of Brain Research at the University of Zurich Switzerland, offer the key in the magazine "Nature Neuroscience". Their work suggests that the environment leaves traces in the brain, organs and also in the gametes. And that it is through small fragments of RNA of…
Read More »
Health

Weight-Loss Surgery Could Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Bariatric Surgery for weight loss in obese patients with type 2 diabetes helped many to reduce their blood sugar to healthy levels and not need more medication for the disease three years after the procedure, according to data presented at a major medical meeting on Monday. The operation also helped patients to reduce the need for treatments for high blood pressure and cholesterol and led to improvements in quality of life compared with those who received medical therapy for weight loss, the researchers discovered. The study, called Stampede, which involved 150 obese patients who had type 2 mellitus diabetes for at least eight years, was led by…
Read More »
Featured

Stem Cell Study Contained ‘Fraudulent’ Parts

The Nippon Research Institute of Riken acknowledged today that the last and revolutionary study on stem cells, led by scientist Haruko Obokata, published by the journal "Nature" contained "fraudulent" parts. The study, published in January in two articles that were picked up by "Nature", showed a very simple method to reprogram adult cells (immersing them in an acid or by applying pressure on their membranes) and obtain stem cells, with the ability to become any tissue. Although the great find would simplify the process to obtain these cells (which may constitute the future of regenerative medicine) many researchers began to report, after the publication, the use…
Read More »
Featured

Japan Ordered to Stop Its ‘Research’ Expeditions

Japan will not hunt any more whales in the South seas and in the Antarctic, thanks to a decision of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) which yesterday saw that the Japanese did not have any justification to continue this activity. Every year, Japanese vessels kill nearly 1,000 whales in these waters to feed a program called Jarpa II which, according to the Tokyo Government, has scientific purposes, such as measuring the impacts of the fishery on the populations of these animals, as well as examine their age, eating habits and exposure to toxins. The science produced by the program has…
Read More »
Featured

Black And Latino Children Have More Health Problems Than Whites

Black and Latino schoolchildren in the United States have "substantial inequalities" in their health compared with whites, according to a study published today in the magazine ' New England Journal of Medicine'. The research, funded by the Center for Disease Prevention and Control, led at Children's Hospital in Boston, and focused on the socio-economic conditions and health risks of children in the fifth school year in different regions of the country. The study found that the children of all ethnic groups have better health if their parents have higher education and higher income, or if they have had the advantage of attending certain schools. Although white…
Read More »
Featured

A New Gel May Prevent HIV Infection

A vaginal gel can protect users against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although it has to be used three hours after having sex. At the moment its efficacy and safety has only been tested in monkeys, but in the light of these findings, the researchers believe that it could be used in humans. Developing new methods for preventing infection of the virus of AIDS in countries with few resources is a priority to reduce the spread of the epidemic. Until now, microbicidal gels had proved most effective, although they should be applied before intercourse, which compromised their employment in many…
Read More »
Featured

Being Born Small or Premature Can Lead to Infertility

It is increasingly clear that fetal development influences subsequent life events. Since the cardiovascular risk to the possibilities of developing different diseases may be influenced by what has been experienced in the womb or shortly after leaving it. Now, a study published in the journal BMJ Open, shows that the physical characteristics of girls at birth can affect the chances of being infertile when they become older . Specifically, the study says, a birth weight less than expected (low weight for gestational age) or smaller in size could double the risk of not being able to have children as adults.…
Read More »
Featured

A New Blood Test May be Able to Predict Alzheimer’s 3 Years Before Onset

A new blood test could detect with 90 % accuracy whether a person will develop Alzheimer's or mild cognitive impairment three years in advance, according to a study released by the journal Nature Medicine. The research, conducted by a group of experts from the Georgetown University Medical Center in the Washington DC, found that some changes observed in the blood may mean that the patient is suffering from Alzheimer's in its earliest stage. Scientists examined for five years over 70,525 healthy people and identified ten main phospholipids which could be used to predict whether patients will develop mild cognitive impairment…
Read More »
Featured

Scientists Successfully Reprogram HIV Cells

In the world there is a very small group of people who is immune to the HIV virus that causes AIDS . For years, scientists have attempted to replicate this natural resistance. Now researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, in the United States, managed to genetically engineer the immune cells of 12 patients with HIV to make them resistant to the virus. Using a relatively new techniques, scientists edited the genome of the cells in the immune system and removed a protein that makes most people susceptible to the virus. To do this, patients who participated in the research published…
Read More »
Featured

RI Has Second Worst Unemployment Rate in the Country

For the year of 2013, Rhode Island had the second worst unemployment rate in the country at percent. Only Nevada came first with an unemployment rate of percent. These figures are according to revised state-by-state figures released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For nearly the entire year, Nevada maintained an unemployment rate higher than that of RI. Beginning in January, Nevada had a rate at percent compared to RI's percent. Despite this, Nevada's rate of unemployment steadily decreased throughout the year. Meanwhile, RI unemployment rate fluctuated between and percent during the first nine months of the year. Both…
Read More »
12