Health

Google Working on Contact Lenses to Measure Glucose

In a recent collaboration, Google and University of Washington researchers have teamed up to develop a new way of measuring a person's blood glucose levels using contact lenses. The idea is that these contact lenses would be able to measure glucose levels found in tears and send the reading to the person's mobile phone. If their endeavor is successful, then it may be possible that diabetics may stop drawing blood to measure their sugar levels. Worldwide, diabetes affects about 400 million people. Untreated, the disease can lead to complications such as blindness, nerve damage, cardiovascular problems, and in the most…
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Featured

FDA Launches New Anti-Smoking Campaign

The Food and Drug administration is launching a new campaign geared towards teens in hopes of stopping them from smoking and encouraging them to quit. This $115 million multimedia education campaign called "The Real Cost" will use adds depicting yellow teeth, wrinkled skin, and other costs at-risk teenagers face if they smoke cigarettes. Beginning February 11, advertisements will run in over 200 markets throughout the US for at least one year. Ads will air on TV stations like MTV and be found in magazines such as Teen Vogue. They will also use social media, which today's youth heavily uses. "Our…
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Health

Sugar and Its Link to Increased Heart Disease

There is a consensus among experts that the average US diet contains too much added sugar. In other words, added sugar is the kind that does not occur naturally and is introduced during food processing. A new study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine found that eating added sugar increased a person's risk of dying as a result of cardiovascular disease. “Compared with those who consumed approximately percent of calories from added sugar, participants who consumed approximately 17 percent to 21 percent … of calories from added sugar had a 38 percent higher risk of CVD mortality,” Dr. Quanhe Yang,…
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Featured

Massachusetts Grants 20 Medical Marijuana Dispensary Licenses

Last November voters approved a ballot initiative to legalize medical marijuana in the state of Massachusetts. Now it has granted the first 20 dispensary licenses across 10 of its 14 counties. Despite being permitted to award up to 35 licenses, the state has only decided to grant 20, leaving many wondering about the Registered Marijuana Dispensary Selection Committee's strategies. Despite being awarded a license, these companies will still have to pass a final inspection by the state health department and must comply with local requirements before opening. There are still mixed feeling among residents about medical marijuana. Some local officials…
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Health

Older Women Have Reduced Risk of Having a Child With Congenital Defects

As a woman gets older, there is a higher risk when it comes to pregnancy. Despite the fact that women who are 35 or older tend to have more babies born with Down Syndrome, new research reveals that they also give birth to children with fewer physical defects. Women ages 35 and older carry a greater risk of producing a child that carries a chromosomal abnormality, a result of nondisjunction during meiosis when chromosomes fail to separate. While there has been research on chromosomal abnormalities, not much has been researched concerning congenital defects which affect the heart, brain, kidneys, bones,…
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Health

‘Invisible Group’ of Teens Could Face Psychiatric Risks

Anxiety and depression are just a few of the mental health conditions that teens who use substances experience when compared to teens who do not use substances. But according to a new study, certain lifestyle habits could contribute to psychiatric risks. Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet found that there is an "invisible risk" group of teens. They tend to be characterized by high media use, low exercise levels, and low sleep. These teens have a higher risk of psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts, The study included 12,000 teens from 11 different European countries. The teens were…
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HEALTH Announces First Flu Deaths of the Season

The Rhode Island Department of Health (HEALTH) reports today that two influenza-related deaths occurred in January, the state’s first two of the 2013-2014 flu season. The first individual, a male in his 50s who had underlying medical conditions, died on January 1. The second individual was a male in his 80s who also had underlying medical conditions and passed away on January 25. The delay in reporting the deaths was a result of the time needed to conduct tests to confirm that the flu was the cause of death. “This is a very sad reminder that influenza is a serious…
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