WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressmen Jim Langevin (D-RI) and Glenn ‘GT’ Thompson (R-PA),
co-chairs of the Congressional Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, today
introduced a resolution recognizing National CTE Month, which is celebrated every
February.

“I’m thrilled to join Congressman Thompson in recognizing National CTE Month, a time
to celebrate CTE programs across the United States and raise awareness about how
they help build a skilled national workforce,” said Congressman Langevin. “Too many
businesses in Rhode Island struggle to fill job openings because of a lack of
skilled workers. As co-chair of the CTE Caucus, I’m proud to support programs that
help close the skills gap and ensure expanding industries have access to the talent
they need to succeed.”

“As Co-Chair of the Career and Technical Education Caucus, I am pleased to designate
February as CTE Month,” said Congressman Thompson. “Given the dramatic evolution of
our nation’s workforce, it is imperative that we create clear pathways to education
and training for students interested in pursuing careers in high-demand industries
and technical fields. We saw President Trump highlight the increased need for
vocational schools during his State of the Union address, and I wholeheartedly
agree. If we are going to permanently close the nation’s skills-gap and restore
rungs on the ladder of opportunity, it will be through enhanced career and technical
education opportunities.”

Nearly 12 million students are enrolled in CTE programs at high schools, career
academies, CTE centers, and two-year colleges across the country. The resolution
recognizes the importance of CTE and encourages educators, counselors, career
development professionals, and parents to promote CTE as an option for students.

Last year, the House of Representatives passed bipartisan
legislation
led by Thompson and Langevin to strengthen CTE programs through the reauthorization
of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. The Perkins Act provides
resources to local CTE programs to prepare students for careers in high-demand
fields.